On the bookshelf: April.

Another month, another piles of books on my bookshelf. This month’s focus – young adult novels and a self help book.

Keep scrolling for more.

Saint Anything – Sarah Dessen.
I am a pretty big fan of Sarah Dessen’s work. I’ve actually only read one of her books before – The Truth About Forever. I honestly just really enjoy Dessen’s writing style and the ease in which she delivers the story line and characters. Saint Anything definitely reinforced the love that I have for Dessen’s novels. The book is about a girl called Sydney and how her life changes after her older brother Peyton goes to jail for a drink driving offence. In an effort to remove herself from the unwanted attention at her school caused by Peyton’s sentence, Sydney moves to a new school where she meets the Chatham family described as “a warm, chaotic family who run a pizza parlor, play bluegrass on weekends, and pitch in to care for their mother, who has multiple sclerosis.”
And its here she meets Mac Chatham. Gorgeous, caring and protective Mac.

The novel really talks about a lot of things like forgiveness, feeling invisible, family, friendship, creepy weird men and how hard it might be to find your place in the world. Yeah sure, there is the focus on the love story, but doesn’t every YA have that focus? What is more important here is the beautiful friendship that Sydney forms with the Chatham family. Things like that were the reason I really enjoyed this book. Coming from a place where I do feel rather lost and rather invisible I definitely resonated with it. If you are in a similar space, or want a decent read, definitely pick up Saint Anything. 

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We’re All Mad Here: The No-Nonsense Guide to Living with Social Anxiety – Claire Eastham.
A little plug about a self help book here and I am not even for one second ashamed. As I mentioned in my last post, I am really focusing on my own recovery at the moment and reading books and articles about my conditions are really helping me accept my illnesses and start to develop my own methods to recover – such as writing. Anyway, this book is basically a guide to anxiety. It uses the authors own experience and coping mechanisms to create this amazingly relatable book that honestly sums up some of my own experiences so well. I loved this book so bloody much I dedicated an entire blog post to it, which you can read more here (do it!!!)

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What Happened to Goodbye – Sarah Dessen
So it’s pretty clear that this month I had a little bit of an obsession with Sarah Dessen. It is definitely not my fault and I’m checking myself into author rehab as you read this… (Lol just joking). But back on track now. This book is definitely not as good as Saint Anything, in fact I enjoyed it a lot less. I think it took a long time to actually get into the story line and then really, there wasn’t too much story line there at all. It follows the story of Mclean, a teenager who has jumped from town to town with her Dad since her parents divorce.

I definitely didn’t enjoy this one as much as much as Saint Anything. I think it seemed to drag on a little too much and just seemed quite… immature to me. I really seemed like a Young Adult novel to me, which Dessen’s books don’t really seem to do. There were a few good themes though in particular identity and family which I did enjoy a lot. Not a bad book but nothing to rave about. Dessen’s writing and the themes within the novel really where the saving grace.

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Vanishing Girls – Lauren Oliver
I didn’t love this book but I didn’t reallllly hate it either. I think the one saving grace is that I LOVE Oliver’s writing style. She tends to use other elements – in this case the blog posts, the newspaper articles and the ‘social media’ element – to create her story. This, combined with her genius writing style, generally make her books a good read. But this one… I just didn’t really love. I mean it hooked me in when I read the blurb – a story about two sisters who have an inseparable bond until an undisclosed accident occurs leaving the two girls estranged. Then Dara, one of the girls, goes missing on her birthday. Her sister Nick believes it is linked to the disappearance of another young girl, 9 year-old Madeleine Snow and Nick begins the mission to find her sister. But I think that the blurb was more enthralling than the actual story.. It set up the idea of a plot that wasn’t actually in the book which was really annoying!

I think this novel is an okay read, particularly if you enjoy Oliver’s writing, but I wouldn’t rush out to buy the book.

-M x

What books have you been reading lately? I’d love to hear your recommendations. 

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On the bookshelf: March.

One of my goals this year was to read more books. I used to absolutely love reading and would read a number of books a week. But then life happens and I went to uni and I forgot how to read anything that wasn’t a uni book or an essay. But now I am an adult with an adult job and free time and all that jazz. So, one of the first things I did when I moved to this new place was to become a member of the local library.

My goal is essentially to read a book a week. I didn’t quite achieve that during March but 3/4 isn’t bad. So since we are almost at the end of March here is a summary of the books I read over the last month and what I thought about them.

Happy Endings – Jon Rance.
I was looking forward to reading this book after I read the blurb on the back. It is about 4 people in their late 20’s – 2 couples – who are each battling with what they want from their life. Emma wants to be an actress. Her fiancee Jack wants to be a published writer, if not for himself, to save his relationship. Kate wants to travel before she turns 30 while her boyfriend, Ed just wants to settle down. The book is broken into ‘chapters’ each written from the perspectives of a different character.
As I said, I was excited to read this. I felt like the plot could go anywhere and it did – just not in the ways I was expecting (or really wanted). I was definitely a little disappointed by this one. It wasn’t so much the story line or the style of writing but the actions of the characters themselves. I got way too involved in their lives and was really disappointed in some of the character development. But then maybe that’s the sign of a good novel? I was so involved with the characters I actually got mad when they did stupid things.

Pick this up if you want an easy read and as the title suggests, a happy ending.

The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks – E.Lockhart.
I don’t really know what I was expecting after reading the blurb of this book because it doesn’t reallllly give anything away but I think it kind of live up to my expectations. I wanted to read this book after reading We Were Liars, also by Lockhart. I absolutely loved it and loved Lockhart’s writing style. I will start off by saying this book is no where near as good as We Were Liars. It’s actually described as a ‘feminist novel’ which I don’t think it really lives up too. In fact, Frankie doesn’t seem like a feminist to me. She kind of just got more annoying and stubborn as the book progressed. And the main thing she does is follow the boys around and try to get their approval and get them to let her into their society. That is not a feminist character.
So after I’ve pointed out the negative parts there are actually two reasons why I like this book. One: it was witty. Frankie is a smart character who just really puts her mind towards the wrong things (like trying to prove herself to the males of the society).
Two: it isn’t filled with all the usual themes of a YA novel. There is a little bit of her relationship with Mathew but the main focus really is about Frankie’s obsession with the all male society at her exclusive boarding school.

Once again, an easy read but nothing to jump through hoops to read.

Breathing Under Water – Sophie Hardcastle
Another YA novel here. Breathing Under Water is Hardcastle’s debut novel and is incredibly raw, gut wrenching, and just really emotional overall. It follows the story of twins Gracie and Ben who were born nineteen minutes and eleven seconds apart (Ben being the older twin). Ben is the ‘golden boy’ – rising surf star and the one all the girls want. Because of this, Grace has always kind of blended in the background which is a pretty key plot point.
The blurb gives you are a really obvious clue that some kind of tragedy is going to happen and it is kind of easy to guess it is going to be something to do with Ben since the book is written from Grace’s perspective. I won’t give it away but basically it shows us Grace’s decline after the tragedy and her battle to find herself again. Once again, it was an easy read but the thing I liked most about this novel was the development of Grace’s character (as much as I didn’t like it in parts) and how beautifully emotive Hardcastle’s writing is. I think the themes within the book are relatable for some people, especially those who have found themselves struggling after a big life change.

-M x

What books did you read in March? Let me know in the comments below.